Elemental Chemistry
Iodine


Iodine is the first member of the halogen family to be solid at ordinary temperatures in its elemental state. The most striking property of elemental iodine is its capacity to change states when exposed to heat: from solid dark purple crystals to vivid violet gas. It also has an unusually high specific gravity, and can be rather easily either reduced or oxidized to one of a diversity of ionic states, resulting in a range of positive or negative validities. Iodine is only slightly soluble in water, but dissolves in many organic solvents and the color of the resulting solutions varies with the nature of the solvent from violet to brown color.

 

The oxidizing properties of iodine containing compounds and their benign environmental character -compared to other halogens- stimulate the development of industrial uses.
New uses for the reactivity of iodine and its derivatives in the synthetic and structural chemistry are still being developed.

 

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF Elemental IODINE

Property Solid Liquid Gaseous
Color
Melting Point [°C]

Boiling Point [°C]

Density, [kg/m3]

Crystal Structure

Viscosity,

[Pa • s] at 116°C

Vapor Pressure,

[Pa] at 25°C

Specific Heat Cp,

[J/(kg • K] at 25°C

Bluish-black
113.6

4.93, at 20°C

Orthorhombic

 

41.33

 

 

Bluish-black

184.4

3.96, at 120°C

2.27 • 10-3

 

 

 

Violet

6.75×10-3, at 185°C

 

 

146.5